Francesco Voltaggio Director of Redemptoris Mater in Galilea

Francesco Voltaggio Director of Redemptoris Mater in Galilea

Since the Declaration of Independence of the State of Israel in 1948, freedom of worship has been a fundamental right. Every religious community is free, legally and de facto, to practice teaching and transmitting its religion, to celebrate its holidays, to observe its weekly day of rest and to administer its own affairs. Israelandyoo met with two men who are representative of this cultural coexistence that constitutes the Hebrew state Fayez Azzam has the appearance and discourse of a sage. His family belonging to the Druze community has been in the country for ten generations. He has lived as a high-ranking civil servant and as a teacher of his culture at the university. He is, like the vast majority of his co-religionists, a model of integration. For him socially and religiously, a Druze is an Israeli like any other, with the same rights and duties.

This time the landscape is already a message. About the two great monotheisms, each stone tells a story of two thousand years. Here we are in the hills of Galilee overlooking Lake Tiberias at the top of the Mount of Beatitudes in the Domus Galilea, a place open to believers of the three religions of the book as well as to lay people and agnostics. We are with the famous Father Francesco Voltaggio. He is an ecclesiastic who communicates and lives ecumenism and the organizer of several large multi-confessional meetings. His creed: every man is holy, since it is the work of God. To the priests that he trains in several languages including Arabic and Hebrew to be able to exchange with all Israelis, he transmits this credo…religiously!

Fayez Azzam and Father Francesco Voltaggio are two examples among many others of how freedom of worship is lived in Israel.